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(ISC)2 Research Report Indicates That Small Businesses May Not Be The Weakest Link In The Supply Chain

Study reveals that cybersecurity staffing and best practices are bigger factors than company size in assessing security risk associated with supply chain partners. (ISC)² – the world’s largest nonprofit association of certified cybersecurity professionals – today released the findings from its.... (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 9:52 pm


US Launches Cyberattack Against Iran’s Military IT Systems

The United States in retaliation to the growing Iranian cyber-activity and the shooting of an unarmed US drone last week has launched a series of cyberattacks against Iran's military IT systems. The strikes against Iran on Thursday were carried out as President Donald Trump backed away from a direct.... (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 8:57 pm


Achieving Warp Speed: Making Sure Your Security Infrastructure is Up to Snuff Will Supercharge Your Incident Responses

When James Kirk found his beloved starship Enterprise unresponsive at a moment in which he and his crew faced seemingly hopeless odds, he would press the communication button on his captain’s chair and bark something at his chief engineer like, “Scotty, we need warp speed in 3 seconds or we’re all.... (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 8:22 pm


Expert Comments On Android Cryptominer Bot

News and articles about cyber security, information security, vulnerabilities, exploits, patches, releases, software, features, hacks, laws, spam, viruses, malware, trojans. A new botnet is abusing Android Debug Bridge (ADB) and SSH to capture & collect new Android devices to its network, according to Trend Micro. (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 6:43 pm


Hackers steal data from telcos in espionage campaign: cyber firm

Investigators at U.S.-Israeli cyber firm Cybereason said on Tuesday the attackers compromised companies in more than 30 countries and aimed to gather information on individuals in government, law-enforcement and politics. The hackers also used tools linked to other attacks attributed to Beijing by.... (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 6:39 pm


Raspberry Pi 4 released; NASA hacked; Verizon internet blackout

Raspberry Pi 4 is here, NASA breach revealed, Verizon hit with a massive internet outage. That’s all the news that’s trending today. It’s Tuesday, June 25th, and I’m your host, Tom Li. Trending on Google , Raspberry Pi, the programmable pocket computer, has been upgraded to version four. (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 6:09 pm


Free proxy service runs on top of Linux Ngioweb Botnet

Researchers from Netlab, discovered a website offering free and commercial proxy servers leveraging a huge botnet (Ngioweb) of hacked WordPress sites. Researchers from Netlab, discovered that Free-Socks.in proxy service is leveraging a huge botnet of hacked WordPress sites. (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 5:06 pm


Veracode to showcase DevSecOps solutions at inaugural AWS re:Inforce

Developers and security professionals from around the world are descending on Boston this week to attend the first AWS security conference, re:Inforce , for what promises to be one of the most exciting events in recent memory in the industry. As a pioneer of application security that is helping.... (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 5:04 pm


Cities Are Under Attack. Here’s Why.

Greenville, North Carolina. Imperial County, California. Stuart, Florida. Cincinnati, Ohio. These are just a handful of cities and counties across the U.S. that have experienced crippling cyber attacks in recent months. In 2019, local governments across the country have become the focus of attacks.... (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 5:01 pm


Chinese Hackers Play Operator With Global Telcos

Attackers have been using the Poison Ivy remote-access tool to help maintain persistent access to hacked networks, Cybereason says. Attackers have been surreptitiously hacking into global telecommunications providers' networks to quietly track subscribers as part of an apparent ongoing espionage operation. (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 4:44 pm


New Mac Malware Exploits GateKeeper Bypass Bug that Apple Left Unpatched

Cybersecurity researchers are warning about possible active exploitation of an unpatched security vulnerability in Apple's macOS Gatekeeper security feature details and PoC for which were publicly disclosed late last month. Joshua Long, a security researcher at Intego, last week discovered four.... (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 3:57 pm


Hackers are stealing years of call records from hacked cell networks

Security researchers say they have uncovered a massive espionage campaign involving the theft of call records from hacked cell network providers to conduct targeted surveillance on individuals of interest. The hackers have systematically broken in to more than 10 cell networks around the world to.... (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 3:44 pm


Australian Hacker to Serve 3 Years in Prison for Insider Trading, Unauthorized Computer Access

A 42-year old Australian IT consultant is going to prison for three years on charges of “insider trading, unauthorized access to data with the intention to commit a serious offence (insider trading) and the alteration of electronic devices required by ASIC,” announced ASIC (Australian Securities & Investments Commission) on Tuesday. (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 3:37 pm


Government agencies still send sensitive files via hackable .zips

We – as in, both the public and private sectors – are under the delusion that emailing content as password-protected .zip files is a secure way to share files, Senator Ron Wyden said in a letter sent to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) on Wednesday. (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 3:07 pm


Mobile phones to be banned in state primary and secondary schools

Mobile phones will be banned from Victorian state primary and secondary schools under strict new rules aimed at tackling cyber bullying and distractions in the classroom. The Victorian government has adopted one of the world's toughest stances on mobile phone use in schools and from the start of.... (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 2:18 pm


Thousands of dodgy copycat apps identified in Google Play Store

A two-year study has discovered 2,040 malware-laden counterfeit apps in the official Android app store, Google Play. Researchers from the University of Sydney and CSIRO’s Data61 investigated more than a million apps, discovering a huge number impersonated popular games and contained malware. (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 2:10 pm


DDoS-for-Hire Services Doubled in Q1

Impact of FBI's takedown of 15 'booter' domains last December appears to have been temporary. New data published this week demonstrates the troubling resilience of cybercriminals against mounting domestic and international efforts to stop them. Nexusguard analyzed data gathered from multiple public.... (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 1:47 pm


Two brothers arrested for Bitfinex hack and multi-year cryptocurrency phishing campaign

Computer crime authorities in Israel have arrested two brothers in connection with a phishing campaign that spread over multiple years and the 2016 hack of the Bitfinex cryptocurrency exchange. 21-year-old Assaf Gigi and his older brother Eli, both from Jerusalem, were arrested by Lahav 433 (the.... (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 12:48 pm


ABB IDAL HTTP Server Uncontrolled Format String - CXSecurity.com

XL-19-012 - ABB IDAL HTTP Server Uncontrolled Format String Vulnerability ======================================================================== Identifiers ----------- XL-19-012 CVE-2019-7228 ABBVU-IAMF-1902007 CVSS Score ---------- 8.8 (AV:A/AC:L/PR:N/UI:N/S:U/C:H/I:H/A:H) Affected vendor --------------- ABB (new. (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 11:41 am


You don’t just acquire a company, but also its cybersecurity posture

The importance of a healthy cybersecurity posture. Cybersecurity concerns discovered after consummation of the deal often present costly risks that would have been factored into the deal negotiations and/or may have led to the dissolution of the deal. After closing the acquisition, 65% experienced.... (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 9:31 am


Why businesses need IAM to push their zero trust frameworks forward

+ Watch the recorded webinar: Inside a Docker Cryptojacking Exploit Many organizations are finding themselves between a rock and a hard place when it comes to the security of their digital transformation strategies. On the one hand, the number of data breaches continue to increase and damages.... (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 9:31 am


SocialEngineered forum hacked and data leaked online

SocialEngineered.net, the forum dedicated to social engineering topics, announced it has suffered a data breach two weeks ago. Hackers accessed data from tens of thousands of members and leaked them online on a hacker forum. The hackers exploited a vulnerability in the MyBB forum to access forum data. (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 9:08 am


7 steps to enhance IoT security

Securing the IoT is a multi-faceted effort that requires big moves as well as small adjustments to ensure networks, systems, data and devices are protected. Here are 7 security practices you might not have considered. One of the biggest concerns with the Internet of Things ( IoT ) is making sure networks, data, and devices are secure. (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 8:28 am


UltraSoC closes a £5m funding round to grow its worldwide operations

UltraSoC announced plans to substantially grow its worldwide operations to address emerging opportunities in the cybersecurity, high-reliability and safety-critical systems markets. This latest expansion follows the successful closing of a £5m equity funding round, in which cybersecurity-focused.... (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 5:28 am


Small town pays hackers $600,000 to get computers back, don't let this happen to you

Paying the ransom and hoping for the best isn't a great plan. Unlike major cities, Riviera Beach City, Florida, has decided to pay the hackers holding its computers hostage. It's the latest in a line of cities and corporations that have found themselves victims of ransomware attacks . (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 3:40 am


Device Authority and Tech Mahindra deliver IAM and encryption services to IoT customers

, a global leader in Identity and Access Management (IAM) for the Internet of Things (IoT), announced their strategic partnership with Tech Mahindra , a leading provider of digital transformation, consulting and business reengineering services and solutions. (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 2:51 am


Baffle launches its Cloud Data Protection Platform for AWS

, unveiled its Cloud Data Protection Platform (CDPP) for AWS, a simplified encryption solution specifically designed to help customers secure their data in AWS. Enterprises continue to race to the cloud and other modern platforms, but legacy encryption approaches that were not designed for the.... (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 2:19 am


Why is Your Website a Target? The SEO Value of a Website

. Website security is what we eat, sleep, and breathe. It’s what we do best because we deal with hacked websites every single day, thousands of them. Among the various types and evolution in attack scenarios, one has remained the same for all these years—spam infections. (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 2:10 am


Trump puts sanctions on Iranian supreme leader, other top officials

WASHINGTON/RIYADH (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump targeted Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and other top Iranian officials with sanctions on Monday, taking a dramatic, unprecedented step to increase pressure on Iran after Tehran’s downing of an unmanned American drone. (more)

Posted on 25 June 2019 1:49 am


Symantec’s Cloud Security Threat Report Shines a Light on the Cloud’s Real Risks

We found that the complexity in the way the cloud is used creates serious visibility problems for IT. Tracking these cloud workloads is a universally recognized problem. Ninety three percent of survey respondents report they have issues keeping tabs on all their cloud workloads. And the problem will continue to grow rapidly. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 11:47 pm


NA - USN-4031-1 - Linux kernel vulnerability

A security issue affects these releases of Ubuntu and its derivatives: - Ubuntu 19.04 - Ubuntu 18.10 - Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. Summary: 64-Bit PowerPC systems could be made to expose sensitive information. Software Description: - linux: Linux kernel - linux-hwe: Linux hardware enablement (HWE) kernel. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 11:08 pm


CVE-2019-7232

Description. The ABB IDAL HTTP server is vulnerable to a buffer overflow when a long Host header is sent in a web request. The Host header value overflows a buffer and overwrites a Structured Exception Handler (SEH) address. An unauthenticated attacker can submit a Host header value of 2047 bytes or.... (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 10:47 pm


RDP Security Explained

RDP on the Radar. Eamonn Ryan Recently, McAfee released a blog related to the wormable RDP vulnerability referred to as CVE-2019-0708 or “Bluekeep.” The blog highlights a particular vulnerability in RDP which was deemed critical by Microsoft due to the fact that it exploitable over a network connection without authentication. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 9:12 pm


Vietnam jails US citizen for 'state overthrow' attempt

Hanoi (AFP) - A US citizen was sentenced Monday to 12 years in Vietnamese prison for "attempting to overthrow the state", a lawyer and state media said, as the one-party country squeezes dissent. Vietnamese-American Michael Nguyen was detained in July last year while travelling in the country with two activists, who were also arrested. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 8:57 pm


CISA Statement on Iranian Cybersecurity Threats

Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) Director Christopher C. Krebs has released a statement in response to the recent rise in malicious cyber activity—including spear phishing and brute force attacks—by Iranian regime actors and proxies. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 8:33 pm


CVE-2019-1630 (integrated_management_controller, unified_computing_system)

Current Description. A vulnerability in the firmware signature checking program of Cisco Integrated Management Controller (IMC) could allow an authenticated, local attacker to cause a buffer overflow, resulting in a denial of service (DoS) condition. The vulnerability is due to insufficient checking of an input buffer. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 8:04 pm


How to Fill the Cybersecurity Skills Gap - Infosecurity Magazine

Cyber-attacks on businesses and individuals are growing in frequency and impact. In 2016, Telstra reported that 60% of businesses had experienced at least one disruptive security breach per month, up from 23.7% the year before. Yet, despite the growing threat of cybersecurity breaches, there’s a.... (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 7:39 pm


Christian Lobby launches a new fundraising site for Israel Folau after his GoFundMe page was removed

The decision of GoFundMe to cancel Israel's fundraising campaign to support his Legal Action Fund is very disappointing. The fundraising campaign was in line with GoFundMe's Terms and Conditions as well as all relevant rules and regulations. Unfortunately, GoFundMe has buckled to demands against the freedom of Australians to donate to his cause. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 6:55 pm


TrueFort Secures $13.7 Million in Series A Funding (SecurityWeek)

Real-time application behavior analytics, control, and protection provider TrueFort has raised $13.7 million in a Series A funding round. Founded in 2015, the New Jersey-based company provides an application behavior security analytics platform for comprehensive monitoring of servers, databases and.... (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 5:52 pm


Shorten, holidaying in Bali, phones in to shadow cabinet meeting

With the demise of the Currawong Workers’ Holiday Camp on the Northern Beaches, where are former unionists expected to go for their well-earned breaks? If you’re ex-Labor leader and one-time Australian Workers’ Union boss Bill Shorten , that would be the sun-soaked shores of Bali. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 5:49 pm


TripAdvisor deactivates passwords of members whose data has been affected in previous breaches

The firm believes that threat actors can misuse these stolen credentials to perform credential stuffing attack. TripAdvisor has also asked its users not to reuse the same password in other services. The popular travel guide and restaurant review website, ‘TripAdvisor. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 4:51 pm


Iran says U.S. cyber attacks failed, hints talks are possible

The longtime foes have come the closest in years to a direct military confrontation in the past week with the shooting down of a U.S. drone by Iran. U.S. President Donald Trump aborted a retaliatory strike just minutes before impact. U.S. media have reported that the United States launched cyber attacks even as Trump called off the air strike. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 4:33 pm


Mac Malware Delivered via Firefox Exploits Analyzed

News and articles about cyber security, information security, vulnerabilities, exploits, patches, releases, software, features, hacks, laws, spam, viruses, malware, trojans. A researcher has conducted a detailed analysis of the two pieces of Mac malware delivered recently by threat actors to.... (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 4:12 pm


DoH! Will the new protocol change how infosec professionals work

Andrew Wertkin, CTO of BlueCat Networks, returns to the podcast to discuss a new and hotly contested privacy technology called DNS over HTTPS (DoH), the ethical and procedural issues around DoH, and how it may change the way infosec professionals work. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 3:55 pm


Waterbug hackers hijack rivals to launch cyber attacks

The Waterbug cyber espionage group has continued to successfully attack government institutions across the globe with a refreshed toolkit and a novel method of malware distribution. A report by Symantec which surveilled the cyber group over a period of 18 months found that the group was using a new,.... (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 3:39 pm


Grade Hacking Services And Fake Diplomas Easily Available Online During Exam Season

Cybercriminals are taking advantage of summer exam pressures by offering black market grade-hacking services and fake qualifications online, and ensuring these opportunities are easy to find with a quick internet search, Kaspersky researchers have found. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 2:28 pm


DSA-4470 pdns - security update

Two vulnerabilities have been discovered in pdns, an authoritative DNS server which may result in denial of service via malformed zone records and excessive NOTIFY packets in a master/slave setup. For the stable distribution (stretch), these problems have been fixed in version 4.0.3-1+deb9u5. We recommend that you upgrade your pdns packages. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 2:19 pm


DHS: Conflict With Iran Could Spur 'Wiper' Attacks

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security's building in Washington (Source: /CC) Wikipedia Iran is increasing its malicious cyber activity against the U.S, which could manifest in "wiper" attacks that render computers unusable, a top U.S. cybersecurity official said on Sunday. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 12:14 pm


U.S. explores requiring domestic 5G equipment to be made outside China

U.S. President Donald Trump is looking to require next-generation 5G cellular equipment used in the United States to be designed and manufactured outside China, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday, citing people familiar with the matter. As part of a 150-day review that started after.... (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 12:07 pm


Cyber Risk Insurance Sector to Reach $7.5 Billion by End of the Decade, PwC Says

Cyber insurance is clearly a good idea, considering the rapid growth of technology and daily malware releases. June isn’t even over and already 6.46 million new pieces of malware appeared this month, as per AV-Test. But simply because a company chooses to protect its assets in case of a breach, it.... (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 11:36 am


White House Is Pressing for Additional Options, Including in Cyberspace, to Deter Iranian Attacks - The New York Times

against further aggression. Intelligence and military officials have told White House policymakers, including Mr. Trump, that without an additional American response, Iran will continue to destabilize the region. Some divisions of opinion in the administration remain. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 9:57 am


High CVE-2018-16117: Sophos SFOS

A shell escape vulnerability in /webconsole/Controller in Admin Portal of Sophos XG firewall 17.0.8 MR-8 allow remote authenticated attackers to execute arbitrary OS commands via shell metacharacters in the "dbName" POST parameter. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 9:50 am


Why poor visibility is hampering cybersecurity

Enterprises are challenged with security basics , according to Panaseer’s first Security Leader’s Peer Report. Data from an external survey of 200 enterprise security leaders, conducted by Censuswide, reveals concerns on visibility and access to trusted data, leaving organizations open to attack. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 9:31 am


How past threats and technical developments influence the evolution of malware

If we want to anticipate how malware will evolve in the near future, we have to keep two things in mind: past threats and current technical developments. “The evolution of malware-related threats is like a sine wave movement, re-infused by new technology developments,” Christiaan Beek, Lead.... (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 9:15 am


Hackers Take Complete Control of Your Android Device by Launching MobOk Malware via Fake Photo Editing Apps in Google Play

Researchers discovered a fake photo editing apps which are used by cybercriminals to launch MobOk Malware that takes complete control of the infected Android device. Threat actors are targeting Android users through legitimate Google play store app and hiding this malware to steal money by letting users subscribe to premium services. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 8:49 am


Huawei Asks India to Take 'Informed and Independent Decision' on 5G Trials

Huawei has urged India to make an "informed and independent decision" on permitting its 5G trials in the country as the Chinese telecom giant reeled under pressure following the US ban. The US has banned Huawei , the world's leader in telecom equipment and the number two smartphone producer, over.... (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 8:15 am


Indegy unveils CIRRUS, offering ICS security as a cloud-delivered service

, a leading provider of security solutions for industrial control system (ICS) and operational technology (OT) environments, announced the general availability of Indegy CIRRUS, the industry’s first Industrial CyberSecurity as a Service (ICSaaS) offering. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 6:06 am


NASA Hacked through an Unauthorized Raspberry Pi Computer Connected to the NASA Servers

NASA confirmed that hackers gained access to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) last year and they able to steal 500MB of data that related to Mars missions. The hackers breached into NASA network in April 2018 and intrusion remains undetected nearly for a year. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 5:46 am


Tor Browser 8.5.3 Fixes a Sandbox Escape Vulnerability in Firefox

Tor Browser 8.5.3 has been released to fix a Sandbox Escape vulnerability in Firefox that was recently used as part of a targeted attack against cryptocurrency companies. As this vulnerability is actively being used, it is strongly advised that all Tor users upgrade to the latest version. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 3:04 am


U.S. Government Warns of Data Wipers Used in Iranian Cyberattacks

According to a statement by the U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, an increase in cyberattacks utilizing destructive wiper tools has been detected targeting U.S. industries and government agencies by Iranian actors or proxies. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 3:04 am


Forcepoint appoints Shayne Higdon as COO

Global cybersecurity leader Forcepoint announced transformational technology business leader Shayne Higdon has joined the company as chief operating officer (COO). Higdon reports to CEO Matthew Moynahan and will be based in Forcepoint’s Austin, Texas headquarters. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 2:47 am


Iranian hackers wage cyber campaign amid tensions - Youngstown Vindicator

Associated Press. WASHINGTON. Iran has increased its offensive cyberattacks against the U.S. government and critical infrastructure as tensions have grown between the two nations, cybersecurity firms say. In recent weeks, hackers believed to be working for the Iranian government have targeted U.S. (more)

Posted on 24 June 2019 1:17 am


Another vulnerability found in Dell’s security bloatware, users must update ASAP

Mark Coppock/Digital Trends. It’s been a rough week for security issues at Dell. A serious security vulnerability in the company’s SupportAssist software was disclosed by cybersecurity firm SafeBreach , and revealed to effect not only Dell machines but also other OEMs which used the rebranded software on their computers. (more)

Posted on 23 June 2019 11:03 pm


Presidential alerts can be easily spoofed, thanks to LTE security vulnerabilities

Last year, the United States performed the first public test of the national Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA), an alert system designed to send messages to smartphones, TVs, and other systems simultaneously. The test was specifically for the 'Presidential Alert,' a new category that can't be opted out of (like AMBER alerts). (more)

Posted on 23 June 2019 8:48 pm


Amid tough talk, Trump says he could be Iran's 'best friend'

Washington: President Donald Trump has said that military action against Iran was still an option for its downing of an unmanned US military aircraft, but amid heightened tensions he dangled the prospect of eventually becoming an unlikely "best friend" of America's longtime Middle Eastern adversary. (more)

Posted on 23 June 2019 10:12 am


FedEx cites 'operational error' for not delivering Huawei phone to US: report

REUTERS: FedEx Corp said an "operational error" caused a Huawei Technologies Co Ltd phone to not be delivered to the United States and the package delivery company apologised for the error, the Global Times reported on Sunday. "FedEx can accept and transport all Huawei products except for any shipments addressed to listed Huawei entities on the U. (more)

Posted on 23 June 2019 8:47 am


With Trump's approval, Pentagon launched cyber strikes against Iran - Stars and Stripes

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump approved an offensive cyber strike that disabled Iranian computer systems used to control rocket and missile launches, even as he backed away from a conventional military attack in response to its shoot-down Thursday of an unmanned U.S. surveillance drone, according to people familiar with the matter. (more)

Posted on 23 June 2019 3:52 am


PHOENIX CONTACT Automation Worx Software Suite

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 20 June 2019 4:19 pm


AA19-168A: Microsoft Operating Systems BlueKeep Vulnerability

Original release date: June 17, 2019 Summary The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) is issuing this Activity Alert to provide information on a vulnerability, known as “BlueKeep,” that exists in the following Microsoft Windows Operating Systems (OSs), including both 32- and 64-bit versions, as well as all Service Pack versions: Windows 2000 Windows Vista Windows XP Windows 7 Windows Server 2003 Windows Server 2003 R2 Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2008 R2 An attacker can exploit this vulnerability to take control of an affected system.      Technical Details BlueKeep (CVE-2019-0708) exists within the Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) used by the Microsoft Windows OSs listed above. An attacker can exploit this vulnerability to perform remote code execution on an unprotected system.  According to Microsoft, an attacker can send specially crafted packets to one of these operating systems that has RDP enabled. [1] After successfully sending the packets, the attacker would have the ability to perform a number of actions: adding accounts with full user rights; viewing, changing, or deleting data; or installing programs. This exploit, which requires no user interaction, must occur before authentication to be successful. BlueKeep is considered “wormable” because malware exploiting this vulnerability on a system could propagate to other vulnerable systems; thus, a BlueKeep exploit would be capable of rapidly spreading in a fashion similar to the WannaCry malware attacks of 2017. [2] CISA has coordinated with external stakeholders and determined that Windows 2000 is vulnerable to BlueKeep. Mitigations CISA encourages users and administrators review the Microsoft Security Advisory [3] and the Microsoft Customer Guidance for CVE-2019-0708 [4] and apply the appropriate mitigation measures as soon as possible: Install available patches. Microsoft has released security updates to patch this vulnerability. Microsoft has also released patches for a number of OSs that are no longer officially supported, including Windows Vista, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003. As always, CISA encourages users and administrators to test patches before installation. For OSs that do not have patches or systems that cannot be patched, other mitigation steps can be used to help protect against BlueKeep: Upgrade end-of-life (EOL) OSs. Consider upgrading any EOL OSs no longer supported by Microsoft to a newer, supported OS, such as Windows 10. Disable unnecessary services. Disable services not being used by the OS. This best practice limits exposure to vulnerabilities.   Enable Network Level Authentication. Enable Network Level Authentication in Windows 7, Windows Server 2008, and Windows Server 2008 R2. Doing so forces a session request to be authenticated and effectively mitigates against BlueKeep, as exploit of the vulnerability requires an unauthenticated session. Block Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) port 3389 at the enterprise perimeter firewall. Because port 3389 is used to initiate an RDP session, blocking it prevents an attacker from exploiting BlueKeep from outside the user’s network. However, this will block legitimate RDP sessions and may not prevent unauthenticated sessions from being initiated inside a network. References [1] Microsoft Security Advisory for CVE-2019-0708 [2] White House Press Briefing on the Attribution of the WannaCry Malware Attack to North Korea [3] Microsoft Security Advisory for CVE-2019-0708 [4] Microsoft Customer Guidance for CVE-2019-0708 Revisions June 17, 2019: Initial version June 17, 2019: Revised technical details section. This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy. (more)

Posted on 17 June 2019 4:37 pm


BD Alaris Gateway Workstation

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 13 June 2019 7:10 pm


Johnson Controls exacqVision Enterprise System Manager

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 13 June 2019 7:05 pm


WAGO Industrial Managed Switches 852-303, 852-1305, and 852-1505

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 13 June 2019 7:00 pm


DICOM Standard in Medical Devices

Alert Document (more)

Posted on 11 June 2019 7:15 pm


Siemens Siveillance VMS

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 11 June 2019 5:15 pm


Siemens SIMATIC Ident MV420 and MV440 Families

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 11 June 2019 5:10 pm


Siemens LOGO!8 Devices

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 11 June 2019 5:05 pm


Siemens SCALANCE X

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 11 June 2019 5:00 pm


Optergy Proton Enterprise Building Management System

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 6 June 2019 7:05 pm


Panasonic Control FPWIN Pro

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 6 June 2019 7:00 pm


PHOENIX CONTACT PLCNext AXC F 2152

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 4 June 2019 7:10 pm


PHOENIX CONTACT FL NAT SMx

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 4 June 2019 7:05 pm


Geutebrück G-Cam and G-Code

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 4 June 2019 7:00 pm


AVEVA Vijeo Citect and CitectSCADA

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 30 May 2019 5:00 pm


Emerson Ovation OCR400 Controller

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 28 May 2019 5:00 pm


Computrols CBAS Web

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 21 May 2019 5:05 pm


Mitsubishi Electric MELSEC-Q Series Ethernet Module

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 21 May 2019 5:00 pm


Schneider Electric Modicon Controllers

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 16 May 2019 5:05 pm


Fuji Electric Alpha7 PC Loader

Advisory Document (more)

Posted on 16 May 2019 5:00 pm


AA19-122A: New Exploits for Unsecure SAP Systems

Original release date: May 02, 2019 | Last revised: May 03, 2019 Summary The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) is issuing this activity alert in response to recently disclosed exploits that target unsecure configurations of SAP components. [ 1 ] Technical Details A presentation at the April 2019 Operation for Community Development and Empowerment (OPCDE) cybersecurity conference describes SAP systems with unsecure configurations exposed to the internet. Typically, SAP systems are not intended to be exposed to the internet as it is an untrusted network. Malicious cyber actors can attack and compromise these unsecure systems with publicly available exploit tools, termed “10KBLAZE.” The presentation details the new exploit tools and reports on systems exposed to the internet. SAP Gateway ACL The SAP Gateway allows non-SAP applications to communicate with SAP applications. If SAP Gateway access control lists (ACLs) are not configured properly (e.g., gw/acl_mode = 0), anonymous users can run operating system (OS) commands.[ 2 ] According to the OPCDE presentation, about 900 U.S. internet-facing systems were detected in this vulnerable condition. SAP Router secinfo The SAP router is a program that helps connect SAP systems with external networks. The default secinfo configuration for a SAP Gateway allows any internal host to run OS commands anonymously. If an attacker can access a misconfigured SAP router, the router can act as an internal host and proxy the attacker’s requests, which may result in remote code execution. According to the OPCDE presentation, 1,181 SAP routers were exposed to the internet. It is unclear if the exposed systems were confirmed to be vulnerable or were simply running the SAP router service. SAP Message Server SAP Message Servers act as brokers between Application Servers (AS). By default, Message Servers listen on a port 39XX and have no authentication. If an attacker can access a Message Server, they can redirect and/or execute legitimate man-in-the-middle (MITM) requests, thereby gaining credentials. Those credentials can be used to execute code or operations on AS servers (assuming the attacker can reach them). According to the OPCDE presentation, there are 693 Message Servers exposed to the internet in the United States. The Message Server ACL must be protected by the customer in all releases. Signature CISA worked with security researchers from Onapsis Inc.[ 3 ] to develop the following Snort signature that can be used to detect the exploits: alert tcp $EXTERNAL_NET any -> $HOME_NET any (msg:"10KBLAZE SAP Exploit execute attempt"; flow:established,to_server; content:"|06 cb 03|"; offset:4; depth:3; content:"SAPXPG_START_XPG"; nocase; distance:0; fast_pattern; content:"37D581E3889AF16DA00A000C290099D0001"; nocase; distance:0; content:"extprog"; nocase; distance:0; sid:1; rev:1;)   Mitigations CISA recommends administrators of SAP systems implement the following to mitigate the vulnerabilities included in the OPCDE presentation: Ensure a secure configuration of their SAP landscape. Restrict access to SAP Message Server. Review SAP Notes 1408081 and 821875. Restrict authorized hosts via ACL files on Gateways ( gw/acl_mode and secinfo ) and Message Servers ( ms/acl_info ).[ 4 ], [ 5 ] Review SAP Note 1421005. Split MS internal/public: rdisp/msserv=0 rdisp/msserv_internal=39NN . [ 6 ] Restrict access to Message Server internal port ( tcp/39NN ) to clients or the internet. Enable Secure Network Communications (SNC) for clients. Scan for exposed SAP components. Ensure that SAP components are not exposed to the internet. Remove or secure any exposed SAP components. References [1] Comae Technologies: Operation for Community Development and Empowerment (OPCDE) Cybersecurity Conference Materials [2] SAP: Gateway Access Control Lists [3] Onapsis Inc. website [4] SAP Note 1408081 [5] SAP Note 821875 [6] SAP Note 1421005 Revisions May 2, 2019: Initial version This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy. (more)

Posted on 3 May 2019 1:54 am


AA19-024A: DNS Infrastructure Hijacking Campaign

Original release date: January 24, 2019 | Last revised: February 13, 2019 Summary The National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC), part of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), is aware of a global Domain Name System (DNS) infrastructure hijacking campaign. Using compromised credentials, an attacker can modify the location to which an organization’s domain name resources resolve. This enables the attacker to redirect user traffic to attacker-controlled infrastructure and obtain valid encryption certificates for an organization’s domain names, enabling man-in-the-middle attacks. See the following links for downloadable copies of open-source indicators of compromise (IOCs) from the sources listed in the References section below: IOCs (.csv) IOCs (.stix) Note: these files were last updated February 13, 2019, to remove the following three non-malicious IP addresses: 107.161.23.204 192.161.187.200 209.141.38.71 Technical Details Using the following techniques, attackers have redirected and intercepted web and mail traffic, and could do so for other networked services. The attacker begins by compromising user credentials, or obtaining them through alternate means, of an account that can make changes to DNS records. Next, the attacker alters DNS records, like Address (A), Mail Exchanger (MX), or Name Server (NS) records, replacing the legitimate address of a service with an address the attacker controls. This enables them to direct user traffic to their own infrastructure for manipulation or inspection before passing it on to the legitimate service, should they choose. This creates a risk that persists beyond the period of traffic redirection. Because the attacker can set DNS record values, they can also obtain valid encryption certificates for an organization’s domain names. This allows the redirected traffic to be decrypted, exposing any user-submitted data. Since the certificate is valid for the domain, end users receive no error warnings. Mitigations NCCIC recommends the following best practices to help safeguard networks against this threat: Update the passwords for all accounts that can change organizations’ DNS records. Implement multifactor authentication on domain registrar accounts, or on other systems used to modify DNS records. Audit public DNS records to verify they are resolving to the intended location. Search for encryption certificates related to domains and revoke any fraudulently requested certificates. References Cisco Talos blog: DNSpionage Campaign Targets Middle East CERT-OPMD blog: [DNSPIONAGE] – Focus on internal actions FireEye blog: Global DNS Hijacking Campaign: DNS Record Manipulation at Scale Crowdstrike blog: Widespread DNS Hijacking Activity Targets Multiple Sectors Revisions January 24, 2019: Initial version February 6, 2019: Updated IOCs, added Crowdstrike blog February 13, 2019: Updated IOCs This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy. (more)

Posted on 24 January 2019 10:01 pm


AA18-337A: SamSam Ransomware

Original release date: December 03, 2018 Summary The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) are issuing this activity alert to inform computer network defenders about SamSam ransomware, also known as MSIL/Samas.A. Specifically, this product shares analysis of vulnerabilities that cyber actors exploited to deploy this ransomware. In addition, this report provides recommendations for prevention and mitigation. The SamSam actors targeted multiple industries, including some within critical infrastructure. Victims were located predominately in the United States, but also internationally. Network-wide infections against organizations are far more likely to garner large ransom payments than infections of individual systems. Organizations that provide essential functions have a critical need to resume operations quickly and are more likely to pay larger ransoms. The actors exploit Windows servers to gain persistent access to a victim’s network and infect all reachable hosts. According to reporting from victims in early 2016, cyber actors used the JexBoss Exploit Kit to access vulnerable JBoss applications. Since mid-2016, FBI analysis of victims’ machines indicates that cyber actors use Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) to gain persistent access to victims’ networks. Typically, actors either use brute force attacks or stolen login credentials. Detecting RDP intrusions can be challenging because the malware enters through an approved access point. After gaining access to a particular network, the SamSam actors escalate privileges for administrator rights, drop malware onto the server, and run an executable file, all without victims’ action or authorization. While many ransomware campaigns rely on a victim completing an action, such as opening an email or visiting a compromised website, RDP allows cyber actors to infect victims with minimal detection. Analysis of tools found on victims’ networks indicated that successful cyber actors purchased several of the stolen RDP credentials from known darknet marketplaces. FBI analysis of victims’ access logs revealed that the SamSam actors can infect a network within hours of purchasing the credentials. While remediating infected systems, several victims found suspicious activity on their networks unrelated to SamSam. This activity is a possible indicator that the victims’ credentials were stolen, sold on the darknet, and used for other illegal activity. SamSam actors leave ransom notes on encrypted computers. These instructions direct victims to establish contact through a Tor hidden service site. After paying the ransom in Bitcoin and establishing contact, victims usually receive links to download cryptographic keys and tools to decrypt their network. Technical Details NCCIC recommends organizations review the following SamSam Malware Analysis Reports. The reports represent four SamSam malware variants. This is not an exhaustive list. MAR-10219351.r1.v2 – SamSam1 MAR-10166283.r1.v1 – SamSam2 MAR-10158513.r1.v1 – SamSam3 MAR-10164494.r1.v1 – SamSam4 For general information on ransomware, see the NCCIC Security Publication at https://www.us-cert.gov/security-publications/Ransomware . Mitigations DHS and FBI recommend that users and administrators consider using the following best practices to strengthen the security posture of their organization's systems. System owners and administrators should review any configuration changes before implementation to avoid unwanted impacts. Audit your network for systems that use RDP for remote communication. Disable the service if unneeded or install available patches. Users may need to work with their technology venders to confirm that patches will not affect system processes. Verify that all cloud-based virtual machine instances with public IPs have no open RDP ports, especially port 3389, unless there is a valid business reason to keep open RDP ports. Place any system with an open RDP port behind a firewall and require users to use a virtual private network (VPN) to access that system. Enable strong passwords and account lockout policies to defend against brute force attacks. Where possible, apply two-factor authentication. Regularly apply system and software updates. Maintain a good back-up strategy. Enable logging and ensure that logging mechanisms capture RDP logins. Keep logs for a minimum of 90 days and review them regularly to detect intrusion attempts. When creating cloud-based virtual machines, adhere to the cloud provider’s best practices for remote access. Ensure that third parties that require RDP access follow internal policies on remote access. Minimize network exposure for all control system devices. Where possible, disable RDP on critical devices. Regulate and limit external-to-internal RDP connections. When external access to internal resources is required, use secure methods such as VPNs. Of course, VPNs are only as secure as the connected devices. Restrict users' ability (permissions) to install and run unwanted software applications. Scan for and remove suspicious email attachments; ensure the scanned attachment is its "true file type" (i.e., the extension matches the file header). Disable file and printer sharing services. If these services are required, use strong passwords or Active Directory authentication. Additional information on malware incident prevention and handling can be found in Special Publication 800-83, Guide to Malware Incident Prevention and Handling for Desktops and Laptops , from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. [1] Contact Information To report an intrusion and request resources for incident response or technical assistance, contact NCCIC, FBI, or the FBI’s Cyber Division via the following information: NCCIC NCCICCustomerService@hq.dhs.gov 888-282-0870 FBI’s Cyber Division CyWatch@fbi.gov 855-292-3937 FBI through a local field office Feedback DHS strives to make this report a valuable tool for our partners and welcomes feedback on how this publication could be improved. You can help by answering a few short questions about this report at the following URL: https://www.us-cert.gov/forms/feedback . References [1] NIST SP 800-83: Guide to Malware Incident Prevention and Handling for Desktops and Laptops Revisions December 3, 2018: Initial version This product is provided subject to this Notification and this Privacy & Use policy. (more)

Posted on 3 December 2018 6:18 pm


TA18-331A: 3ve – Major Online Ad Fraud Operation

Original release date: November 27, 2018 Systems Affected Microsoft Windows Overview This joint Technical Alert (TA) is the result of analytic efforts between the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). DHS and FBI are releasing this TA to provide information about a major online ad fraud operation—referred to by the U.S. Government as "3ve"—involving the control of over 1.7 million unique Internet Protocol (IP) addresses globally, when sampled over a 10-day window. Description Online advertisers desire premium websites on which to publish their ads and large numbers of visitors to view those ads. 3ve created fake versions of both (websites and visitors), and funneled the advertising revenue to cyber criminals. 3ve obtained control over 1.7 million unique IPs by leveraging victim computers infected with Boaxxe/Miuref and Kovter malware, as well as Border Gateway Protocol-hijacked IP addresses.  Boaxxe/Miuref Malware Boaxxe malware is spread through email attachments and drive-by downloads. The ad fraud scheme that utilizes the Boaxxe botnet is primarily located in a data center. Hundreds of machines in this data center are browsing to counterfeit websites. When these counterfeit webpages are loaded into a browser, requests are made for ads to be placed on these pages. The machines in the data center use the Boaxxe botnet as a proxy to make requests for these ads. A command and control (C2) server sends instructions to the infected botnet computers to make the ad requests in an effort to hide their true data center IPs. Kovter Malware Kovter malware is also spread through email attachments and drive-by downloads. The ad fraud scheme that utilizes the Kovter botnet runs a hidden Chromium Embedded Framework (CEF) browser on the infected machine that the user cannot see. A C2 server tells the infected machine to visit counterfeit websites. When the counterfeit webpage is loaded in the hidden browser, requests are made for ads to be placed on these counterfeit pages. The infected machine receives the ads and loads them into the hidden browser. Impact For the indicators of compromise (IOCs) below, keep in mind that any one indicator on its own may not necessarily mean that a machine is infected. Some IOCs may be present for legitimate applications and network traffic as well, but are included here for completeness. Boaxxe/Miuref Malware Boaxxe malware leaves several executables on the infected machine. They may be found in one or more of the following locations: %UserProfile%\AppData\Local\VirtualStore\lsass.aaa %UserProfile%\AppData\Local\Temp\<RANDOM>.exe %UserProfile%\AppData\Local\<Random eight-character folder name>\<original file name>.exe The HKEY_CURRENT_USER (HKCU) “Run” key is set to the path to one of the executables created above. HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run\<Above path to executable>\ Kovter Malware Kovter malware is found mostly in the registry, but the following files may be found on the infected machine: %UserProfile\AppData\Local\Temp\<RANDOM> .exe/.bat %UserProfile%\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\Content.IE5\<RANDOM>\<RANDOM FILENAME>.exe %UserProfile%\AppData\Local\<RANDOM>\<RANDOM>.lnk %UserProfile%\AppData\Local\<RANDOM>\<RANDOM>.bat Kovter is known to hide in the registry under: HKCU\SOFTWARE\<RANDOM>\<RANDOM> The customized CEF browser is dropped to: %UserProfile%\AppData\Local\<RANDOM> The keys will look like random values and contain scripts. In some values, a User-Agent string can be clearly identified. An additional key containing a link to a batch script on the hard drive may be placed within registry key: HKCU\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run There are several patterns in the network requests that are made by Kovter malware when visiting the counterfeit websites. The following are regex rules for these URL patterns: /?ptrackp=\d{5,8} /feedrs\d/click?feed_id=\d{1,5}&sub_id=\d{1,5}&cid=[a-f0-9-]*&spoof_domain=[\w\.\d-_]*&land_ip=\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3} /feedrs\d/vast_track?a=impression&feed_id=\d{5}&sub_id=\d{1,5}&sub2_id=\d{1,5}&cid=[a-f\d-] The following is a YARA rule for detecting Kovter: rule KovterUnpacked {   meta:     desc = "Encoded strings in unpacked Kovter samples."   strings:     $ = "7562@3B45E129B93"     $ = "@ouhKndCny"     $ = "@ouh@mmEdctffdsr"     $ = "@ouhSGQ"   condition:     all of them } Solution If you believe you may be a victim of 3ve and its associated malware or hijacked IPs, and have information that may be useful to investigators, submit your complaint to www.ic3.gov and use the hashtag 3ve (#3ve) in the body of your complaint. DHS and FBI advise users to take the following actions to remediate malware infections associated with Boaxxe/Miuref or Kovter: Use and maintain antivirus software. Antivirus software recognizes and protects your computer against most known viruses. Security companies are continuously updating their software to counter these advanced threats. Therefore, it is important to keep your antivirus software up-to-date. If you suspect you may be a victim of malware, update your antivirus software definitions and run a full-system scan. (See Understanding Anti-Virus Software for more information.) Avoid clicking links in email. Attackers have become very skilled at making phishing emails look legitimate. Users should ensure the link is legitimate by typing the link into a new browser. (See Avoiding Social Engineering and Phishing Attacks .) Change your passwords. Your original passwords may have been compromised during the infection, so you should change them. (See Choosing and Protecting Passwords .) Keep your operating system and application software up-to-date. Install software patches so that attackers cannot take advantage of known problems or vulnerabilities. You should enable automatic updates of the operating system if this option is available. (See Understanding Patches and Software Updates  for more information.) Use anti-malware tools. Using a legitimate program that identifies and removes malware can help eliminate an infection... (more)

Posted on 27 November 2018 7:09 pm


AA18-284A: Publicly Available Tools Seen in Cyber Incidents Worldwide

Original release date: October 11, 2018 Summary This report is a collaborative research effort by the cyber security authorities of five nations: Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] In it we highlight the use of five publicly available tools, which have been used for malicious purposes in recent cyber incidents around the world. The five tools are: Remote Access Trojan: JBiFrost Webshell: China Chopper Credential Stealer: Mimikatz Lateral Movement Framework: PowerShell Empire C2 Obfuscation and Exfiltration: HUC Packet Transmitter To aid the work of network defenders and systems administrators, we also provide advice on limiting the effectiveness of these tools and detecting their use on a network. The individual tools we cover in this report are limited examples of the types of tools used by threat actors. You should not consider this an exhaustive list when planning your network defense. Tools and techniques for exploiting networks and the data they hold are by no means the preserve of nation states or criminals on the dark web. Today, malicious tools with a variety of functions are widely and freely available for use by everyone from skilled penetration testers, hostile state actors and organized criminals, to amateur cyber criminals. The tools in this Activity Alert have been used to compromise information across a wide range of critical sectors, including health, finance, government, and defense. Their widespread availability presents a challenge for network defense and threat-actor attribution. Experience from all our countries makes it clear that, while cyber threat actors continue to develop their capabilities, they still make use of established tools and techniques. Even the most sophisticated threat actor groups use common, publicly available tools to achieve their objectives. Whatever these objectives may be, initial compromises of victim systems are often established through exploitation of common security weaknesses. Abuse of unpatched software vulnerabilities or poorly configured systems are common ways for a threat actor to gain access. The tools detailed in this Activity Alert come into play once a compromise has been achieved, enabling attackers to further their objectives within the victim’s systems. How to Use This Report The tools detailed in this Activity Alert fall into five categories: Remote Access Trojans (RATs), webshells, credential stealers, lateral movement frameworks, and command and control (C2) obfuscators. This Activity Alert provides an overview of the threat posed by each tool, along with insight into where and when it has been deployed by threat actors. Measures to aid detection and limit the effectiveness of each tool are also described. The Activity Alert concludes with general advice for improving network defense practices. Technical Details Remote Access Trojan: JBiFrost   First observed in May 2015, the JBiFrost RAT is a variant of the Adwind RAT, with roots stretching back to the Frutas RAT from 2012. A RAT is a program that, once installed on a victim’s machine, allows remote administrative control. In a malicious context, it can—among many other functions—be used to install backdoors and key loggers, take screen shots, and exfiltrate data. Malicious RATs can be difficult to detect because they are normally designed not to appear in lists of running programs and can mimic the behavior of legitimate applications. To prevent forensic analysis, RATs have been known to disable security measures (e.g., Task Manager) and network analysis tools (e.g., Wireshark) on the victim’s system. In Use JBiFrost RAT is typically employed by cyber criminals and low-skilled threat actors, but its capabilities could easily be adapted for use by state-sponsored threat actors. Other RATs are widely used by Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) actor groups, such as Adwind RAT, against the aerospace and defense sector; or Quasar RAT, by APT10, against a broad range of sectors. Threat actors have repeatedly compromised servers in our countries with the purpose of delivering malicious RATs to victims, either to gain remote access for further exploitation, or to steal valuable information such as banking credentials, intellectual property, or PII. Capabilities JBiFrost RAT is Java-based, cross-platform, and multifunctional. It poses a threat to several different operating systems, including Windows, Linux, MAC OS X, and Android. JBiFrost RAT allows threat actors to pivot and move laterally across a network or install additional malicious software. It is primarily delivered through emails as an attachment, usually an invoice notice, request for quotation, remittance notice, shipment notification, payment notice, or with a link to a file hosting service. Past infections have exfiltrated intellectual property, banking credentials, and personally identifiable information (PII). Machines infected with JBiFrost RAT can also be used in botnets to carry out distributed denial-of-service attacks. Examples Since early 2018, we have observed an increase in JBiFrost RAT being used in targeted attacks against critical national infrastructure owners and their supply chain operators. There has also been an increase in the RAT’s hosting on infrastructure located in our countries. In early 2017, Adwind RAT was deployed via spoofed emails designed to look as if they originated from Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication, or SWIFT, network services. Many other publicly available RATs, including variations of Gh0st RAT, have also been observed in use against a range of victims worldwide. Detection and Protection Some possible indications of a JBiFrost RAT infection can include, but are not limited to: Inability to restart the computer in safe mode, Inability to open the Windows Registry Editor or Task Manager, Significant increase in disk activity and/or network traffic, Connection attempts to known malicious Internet Protocol (IP) addresses, and Creation of new files and directories with obfuscated or random names. Protection is best afforded by ensuring systems and installed applications are all fully patched and updated. The use of a modern antivirus program with automatic definition updates and regular system scans will also help ensure that most of the latest variants are stopped in their tracks. You should ensure that your organization is able to collect antivirus detections centrally across its estate and investigate RAT detections efficiently. Strict application whitelisting is recommended to prevent infections from occurring. The initial infection mechanism for RATs, including JBiFrost RAT, can be via phishing emails... (more)

Posted on 11 October 2018 6:19 pm


TA18-276B: Advanced Persistent Threat Activity Exploiting Managed Service Providers

Original release date: October 03, 2018 Systems Affected Network Systems Overview The National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) is aware of ongoing APT actor activity attempting to infiltrate the networks of global managed service providers (MSPs). Since May 2016, APT actors have used various tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) for the purposes of cyber espionage and intellectual property theft. APT actors have targeted victims in several U.S. critical infrastructure sectors, including Information Technology (IT), Energy, Healthcare and Public Health, Communications, and Critical Manufacturing. This Technical Alert (TA) provides information and guidance to assist MSP customer network and system administrators with the detection of malicious activity on their networks and systems and the mitigation of associated risks. This TA includes an overview of TTPs used by APT actors in MSP network environments, recommended mitigation techniques, and information on reporting incidents. Description MSPs provide remote management of customer IT and end-user systems. The number of organizations using MSPs has grown significantly over recent years because MSPs allow their customers to scale and support their network environments at a lower cost than financing these resources internally. MSPs generally have direct and unfettered access to their customers’ networks, and may store customer data on their own internal infrastructure. By servicing a large number of customers, MSPs can achieve significant economies of scale. However, a compromise in one part of an MSP’s network can spread globally, affecting other customers and introducing risk. Using an MSP significantly increases an organization’s virtual enterprise infrastructure footprint and its number of privileged accounts, creating a larger attack surface for cyber criminals and nation-state actors. By using compromised legitimate MSP credentials (e.g., administration, domain, user), APT actors can move bidirectionally between an MSP and its customers’ shared networks. Bidirectional movement between networks allows APT actors to easily obfuscate detection measures and maintain a presence on victims’ networks. Note: NCCIC previously released information related to this activity in Alert TA17-117A: Intrusions Affecting Multiple Victims Across Multiple Sectors published on April 27, 2017, which includes indicators of compromise, signatures, suggested detection methods, and recommended mitigation techniques. Technical Details APT APT actors use a range of “living off the land” techniques to maintain anonymity while conducting their attacks. These techniques include using legitimate credentials and trusted off-the-shelf applications and pre-installed system tools present in MSP customer networks. Pre-installed system tools, such as command line scripts, are very common and used by system administrators for legitimate processes. Command line scripts are used to discover accounts and remote systems. PowerSploit is a repository of Microsoft PowerShell and Visual Basic scripts and uses system commands such as netsh . PowerSploit, originally developed as a legitimate penetration testing tool, is widely misused by APT actors. These scripts often cannot be blocked because they are legitimate tools, so APT actors can use them and remain undetected on victim networks. Although network defenders can generate log files, APT actors’ use of legitimate scripts makes it difficult to identify system anomalies and other malicious activity. When APT actors use system tools and common cloud services, it can also be difficult for network defenders to detect data exfiltration. APT actors have been observed using Robocopy—a Microsoft command line tool—to transfer exfiltrated and archived data from MSP client networks back through MSP network environments. Additionally, APT actors have been observed using legitimate PuTTY Secure Copy Client functions, allowing them to transfer stolen data securely and directly to third-party systems. Impact A successful network intrusion can have severe impacts to the affected organization, particularly if the compromise becomes public. Possible impacts include Temporary or permanent loss of sensitive or proprietary information, Disruption to regular operations, Financial losses to restore systems and files, and Potential harm to the organization’s reputation. Solution Detection Organizations should configure system logs to detect incidents and to identify the type and scope of malicious activity. Properly configured logs enable rapid containment and appropriate response. Response An organization’s ability to rapidly respond to and recover from an incident begins with the development of an incident response capability. An organization’s response capability should focus on being prepared to handle the most common attack vectors (e.g., spearphishing, malicious web content, credential theft). In general, organizations should prepare by Establishing and periodically updating an incident response plan. Establishing written guidelines that prioritize incidents based on mission impact, so that an appropriate response can be initiated. Developing procedures and out-of-band lines of communication to handle incident reporting for internal and external relationships. Exercising incident response measures for various intrusion scenarios regularly, as part of a training regime. Committing to an effort that secures the endpoint and network infrastructure: prevention is less costly and more effective than reacting after an incident. Mitigation Manage Supply Chain Risk MSP clients that do not conduct the majority of their own network defense should work with their MSP to determine what they can expect in terms of security. MSP clients should understand the supply chain risk associated with their MSP. Organizations should manage risk equally across their security, legal, and procurement groups. MSP clients should also refer to cloud security guidance from the National Institute of Standards and Technology to learn about MSP terms of service, architecture, security controls, and risks associated with cloud computing and data protection. [1] [2] [3] Architecture Restricting access to networks and systems is critical to containing an APT actor’s movement. Provided below are key items that organizations should implement and periodically audit to ensure their network environment’s physical and logical architecture limits an APT actor’s visibility and access. Virtual Private Network Connection Recommendations Use a dedicated Virtual Private Network (VPN) for MSP connection... (more)

Posted on 3 October 2018 2:47 pm


TA18-276A: Using Rigorous Credential Control to Mitigate Trusted Network Exploitation

Original release date: October 03, 2018 Systems Affected Network Systems Overview This technical alert addresses the exploitation of trusted network relationships and the subsequent illicit use of legitimate credentials by Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) actors. It identifies APT actors' tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) and describes the best practices that could be employed to mitigate each of them. The mitigations for each TTP are arranged according to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Cybersecurity Framework core functions of Protect, Detect, Respond, and Recover. Description APT actors are using multiple mechanisms to acquire legitimate user credentials to exploit trusted network relationships in order to expand unauthorized access, maintain persistence, and exfiltrate data from targeted organizations. Suggested best practices for administrators to mitigate this threat include auditing credentials, remote-access logs, and controlling privileged access and remote access. Impact APT actors are conducting malicious activity against organizations that have trusted network relationships with potential targets, such as a parent company, a connected partner, or a contracted managed service provider (MSP). APT actors can use legitimate credentials to expand unauthorized access, maintain persistence, exfiltrate data, and conduct other operations, while appearing to be authorized users. Leveraging legitimate credentials to exploit trusted network relationships also allows APT actors to access other devices and other trusted networks, which affords intrusions a high level of persistence and stealth. Solution Recommended best practices for mitigating this threat include rigorous credential and privileged-access management, as well as remote-access control, and audits of legitimate remote-access logs. While these measures aim to prevent the initial attack vectors and the spread of malicious activity, there is no single proven threat response. Using a defense-in-depth strategy is likely to increase the odds of successfully disrupting adversarial objectives long enough to allow network defenders to detect and respond before the successful completion of a threat actor’s objectives. Any organization that uses an MSP to provide services should monitor the MSP's interactions within their organization’s enterprise networks, such as account use, privileges, and access to confidential or proprietary information. Organizations should also ensure that they have the ability to review their security and monitor their information hosted on MSP networks. APT TTPs and Corresponding Mitigations The following table displays the TTPs employed by APT actors and pairs them with mitigations that network defenders can implement. Table 1: APT TTPs and Mitigations APT TTPs Mitigations Preparation Allocate operational infrastructure, such as Internet Protocol addresses (IPs). Gather target credentials to use for legitimate access. Protect: Educate users to never click unsolicited links or open unsolicited attachments in emails. Implement an awareness and training program. Detect: Leverage multi-sourced threat-reputation services for files, Domain Name System (DNS), Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), IPs, and email addresses. Engagement Use legitimate remote access, such as virtual private networks (VPNs) and Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP). Leverage a trusted relationship between networks. Protect: Enable strong spam filters to prevent phishing emails from reaching end users. Authenticate inbound email using Sender Policy Framework; Domain-Based Message Authentication, Reporting and Conformance; and DomainKeys Identified Mail to prevent email spoofing. Prevent external access via RDP sessions and require VPN access. Enforce multi-factor authentication and account-lockout policies to defend against brute force attacks. Detect: Leverage multi-sourced threat-reputation services for files, DNS, URLs, IPs, and email addresses. Scan all incoming and outgoing emails to detect threats and filter out executables. Audit all remote authentications from trusted networks or service providers for anomalous activity. Respond and Recover: Reset credentials, including system accounts. Transition to multifactor authentication and reduce use of password-based systems, which are susceptible to credential theft, forgery, and reuse across multiple systems. Presence Execution and Internal Reconnaissance: Write to disk and execute malware and tools on hosts. Use interpreted scripts and run commands in shell to enumerate accounts, local network, operating system, software, and processes for internal reconnaissance. Map accessible networks and scan connected targets. Lateral Movement: Use remote services and log on remotely. Use legitimate credentials to move laterally onto hosts, domain controllers, and servers. Write to remote file shares, such as Windows administrative shares. Credential Access: Locate credentials, dump credentials, and crack passwords. Protect: Deploy an anti-malware solution, which also aims to prevent spyware and adware. Prevent the execution of unauthorized software, such as Mimikatz, by using application whitelisting. Deploy PowerShell mitigations and, in the more current versions of PowerShell, enable monitoring and security features. Prevent unauthorized external access via RDP sessions. Restrict workstations from communicating directly with other workstations. Separate administrative privileges between internal administrator accounts and accounts used by trusted service providers. Enable detailed session-auditing and session-logging. Detect: Audit all remote authentications from trusted networks or service providers. Detect mismatches by correlating credentials used within internal networks with those employed on external-facing systems. Log use of system administrator commands, such as net, ipconfig, and ping. Audit logs for suspicious behavior. Use whitelist or baseline comparison to monitor Windows event logs and network traffic to detect when a user maps a privileged administrative share on a Windows system. Leverage multi-sourced threat-reputation services for files, DNS, URLs, IPs, and email addresses. Respond and Recover: Reset credentials. Monitor accounts associated with a compromise for abnormal behaviors, including unusual connections to nonstandard resources or attempts to elevate privileges, enumerate, or execute unexpected programs or applications... (more)

Posted on 3 October 2018 2:00 pm


TA18-275A: HIDDEN COBRA – FASTCash Campaign

Original release date: October 02, 2018 | Last revised: December 21, 2018 Systems Affected Retail Payment Systems Overview This joint Technical Alert (TA) is the result of analytic efforts between the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of the Treasury (Treasury), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Working with U.S. government partners, DHS, Treasury, and FBI identified malware and other indicators of compromise (IOCs) used by the North Korean government in an Automated Teller Machine (ATM) cash-out scheme—referred to by the U.S. Government as “FASTCash.” The U.S. Government refers to malicious cyber activity by the North Korean government as HIDDEN COBRA. For more information on HIDDEN COBRA activity, visit https://www.us-cert.gov/hiddencobra . FBI has high confidence that HIDDEN COBRA actors are using the IOCs listed in this report to maintain a presence on victims’ networks to enable network exploitation. DHS, FBI, and Treasury are distributing these IOCs to enable network defense and reduce exposure to North Korean government malicious cyber activity. This TA also includes suggested response actions to the IOCs provided, recommended mitigation techniques, and information on reporting incidents. If users or administrators detect activity associated with the malware families associated with FASTCash, they should immediately flag it, report it to the DHS National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) or the FBI Cyber Watch (CyWatch), and give it the highest priority for enhanced mitigation. NCCIC conducted analysis on 10 malware samples related to this activity and produced a Malware Analysis Report (MAR). MAR-10201537, HIDDEN COBRA FASTCash-Related Malware, examines the tactics, techniques, and procedures observed in the malware. Visit the MAR-10201537 page for the report and associated IOCs. Description Since at least late 2016, HIDDEN COBRA actors have used FASTCash tactics to target banks in Africa and Asia. At the time of this TA’s publication, the U.S. Government has not confirmed any FASTCash incidents affecting institutions within the United States. FASTCash schemes remotely compromise payment switch application servers within banks to facilitate fraudulent transactions. The U.S. Government assesses that HIDDEN COBRA actors will continue to use FASTCash tactics to target retail payment systems vulnerable to remote exploitation. According to a trusted partner’s estimation, HIDDEN COBRA actors have stolen tens of millions of dollars. In one incident in 2017, HIDDEN COBRA actors enabled cash to be simultaneously withdrawn from ATMs located in over 30 different countries. In another incident in 2018, HIDDEN COBRA actors enabled cash to be simultaneously withdrawn from ATMs in 23 different countries.   HIDDEN COBRA actors target the retail payment system infrastructure within banks to enable fraudulent ATM cash withdrawals across national borders. HIDDEN COBRA actors have configured and deployed malware on compromised switch application servers in order to intercept and reply to financial request messages with fraudulent but legitimate-looking affirmative response messages. Although the infection vector is unknown, all of the compromised switch application servers were running unsupported IBM Advanced Interactive eXecutive (AIX) operating system versions beyond the end of their service pack support dates; there is no evidence HIDDEN COBRA actors successfully exploited the AIX operating system in these incidents. HIDDEN COBRA actors exploited the targeted systems by using their knowledge of International Standards Organization (ISO) 8583—the standard for financial transaction messaging—and other tactics. HIDDEN COBRA actors most likely deployed ISO 8583 libraries on the targeted switch application servers. Malicious threat actors use these libraries to help interpret financial request messages and properly construct fraudulent financial response messages. Figure 1: Anatomy of a FASTCash scheme A review of log files showed HIDDEN COBRA actors making typos and actively correcting errors while configuring the targeted server for unauthorized activity. Based on analysis of the affected systems, analysts believe that malware—used by HIDDEN COBRA actors and explained in the Technical Details section below—inspected inbound financial request messages for specific primary account numbers (PANs). The malware generated fraudulent financial response messages only for the request messages that matched the expected PANs. Most accounts used to initiate the transactions had minimal account activity or zero balances. Analysts believe HIDDEN COBRA actors blocked transaction messages to stop denial messages from leaving the switch and used a GenerateResponse* function to approve the transactions. These response messages were likely sent for specific PANs matched using CheckPan() verification (see figure 1 for additional details on CheckPan() ). Technical Details HIDDEN COBRA actors used malicious Windows executable applications, command-line utility applications, and other files in the FASTCash campaign to perform transactions and interact with financial systems, including the switch application server. The initial infection vector used to compromise victim networks is unknown; however, analysts surmise HIDDEN COBRA actors used spear-phishing emails in targeted attacks against bank employees. HIDDEN COBRA actors likely used Windows-based malware to explore a bank’s network to identify the payment switch application server. Although these threat actors used different malware in each known incident, static analysis of malware samples indicates similarities in malware capabilities and functionalities. HIDDEN COBRA actors likely used legitimate credentials to move laterally through a bank’s network and to illicitly access the switch application server. This pattern suggests compromised systems within a bank’s network were used to access and compromise the targeted payment switch application server. Upon successful compromise of a bank’s payment switch application server, HIDDEN COBRA actors likely injected malicious code into legitimate processes—using command-line utility applications on the payment switch application server—to enable fraudulent behavior by the system in response to what would otherwise be normal payment switch application server activity. NCCIC collaborated with Symantec cybersecurity researchers to provide additional context on existing analysis [1] . Malware samples analyzed included malicious AIX executable files intended for a proprietary UNIX operating system developed by IBM. The AIX executable files were designed to inject malicious code into a currently running process... (more)

Posted on 2 October 2018 6:45 pm


TA18-201A: Emotet Malware

Original release date: July 20, 2018 Systems Affected Network Systems Overview Emotet is an advanced, modular banking Trojan that primarily functions as a downloader or dropper of other banking Trojans. Emotet continues to be among the most costly and destructive malware affecting state, local, tribal, and territorial (SLTT) governments, and the private and public sectors. This joint Technical Alert (TA) is the result of Multi-State Information Sharing & Analysis Center (MS-ISAC) analytic efforts, in coordination with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC). Description Emotet continues to be among the most costly and destructive malware affecting SLTT governments. Its worm-like features result in rapidly spreading network-wide infection, which are difficult to combat. Emotet infections have cost SLTT governments up to $1 million per incident to remediate. Emotet is an advanced, modular banking Trojan that primarily functions as a downloader or dropper of other banking Trojans. Additionally, Emotet is a polymorphic banking Trojan that can evade typical signature-based detection. It has several methods for maintaining persistence, including auto-start registry keys and services. It uses modular Dynamic Link Libraries (DLLs) to continuously evolve and update its capabilities. Furthermore, Emotet is Virtual Machine-aware and can generate false indicators if run in a virtual environment. Emotet is disseminated through malspam (emails containing malicious attachments or links) that uses branding familiar to the recipient; it has even been spread using the MS-ISAC name. As of July 2018, the most recent campaigns imitate PayPal receipts, shipping notifications, or “past-due” invoices purportedly from MS-ISAC. Initial infection occurs when a user opens or clicks the malicious download link, PDF, or macro-enabled Microsoft Word document included in the malspam. Once downloaded, Emotet establishes persistence and attempts to propagate the local networks through incorporated spreader modules. Figure 1: Malicious email distributing Emotet Currently, Emotet uses five known spreader modules: NetPass.exe, WebBrowserPassView, Mail PassView, Outlook scraper, and a credential enumerator. NetPass.exe is a legitimate utility developed by NirSoft that recovers all network passwords stored on a system for the current logged-on user. This tool can also recover passwords stored in the credentials file of external drives. Outlook scraper is a tool that scrapes names and email addresses from the victim’s Outlook accounts and uses that information to send out additional phishing emails from the compromised accounts. WebBrowserPassView is a password recovery tool that captures passwords stored by Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Safari, and Opera and passes them to the credential enumerator module. Mail PassView is a password recovery tool that reveals passwords and account details for various email clients such as Microsoft Outlook, Windows Mail, Mozilla Thunderbird, Hotmail, Yahoo! Mail, and Gmail and passes them to the credential enumerator module. Credential enumerator is a self-extracting RAR file containing two components: a bypass component and a service component. The bypass component is used for the enumeration of network resources and either finds writable share drives using Server Message Block (SMB) or tries to brute force user accounts, including the administrator account. Once an available system is found, Emotet writes the service component on the system, which writes Emotet onto the disk. Emotet’s access to SMB can result in the infection of entire domains (servers and clients). Figure 2: Emotet infection process To maintain persistence, Emotet injects code into explorer.exe and other running processes. It can also collect sensitive information, including system name, location, and operating system version, and connects to a remote command and control server (C2), usually through a generated 16-letter domain name that ends in “.eu.” Once Emotet establishes a connection with the C2, it reports a new infection, receives configuration data, downloads and runs files, receives instructions, and uploads data to the C2 server. Emotet artifacts are typically found in arbitrary paths located off of the AppData\Local and AppData\Roaming directories. The artifacts usually mimic the names of known executables. Persistence is typically maintained through Scheduled Tasks or via registry keys. Additionally, Emotet creates randomly-named files in the system root directories that are run as Windows services. When executed, these services attempt to propagate the malware to adjacent systems via accessible administrative shares. Note: it is essential that privileged accounts are not used to log in to compromised systems during remediation as this may accelerate the spread of the malware. Example Filenames and Paths: C:\Users\<username>\AppData \Local\Microsoft\Windows\shedaudio.exe C:\Users\<username>\AppData\Roaming\Macromedia\Flash Player\macromedia\bin\flashplayer.exe Typical Registry Keys: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run System Root Directories: C:\Windows\11987416.exe C:\Windows\System32\46615275.exe C:\Windows\System32\shedaudio.exe C:\Windows\SysWOW64\f9jwqSbS.exe Impact Negative consequences of Emotet infection include temporary or permanent loss of sensitive or proprietary information, disruption to regular operations, financial losses incurred to restore systems and files, and potential harm to an organization’s reputation. Solution NCCIC and MS-ISAC recommend that organizations adhere to the following general best practices to limit the effect of Emotet and similar malspam: Use Group Policy Object to set a Windows Firewall rule to restrict inbound SMB communication between client systems. If using an alternative host-based intrusion prevention system (HIPS), consider implementing custom modifications for the control of client-to-client SMB communication. At a minimum, create a Group Policy Object that restricts inbound SMB connections to clients originating from clients. Use antivirus programs, with automatic updates of signatures and software, on clients and servers. Apply appropriate patches and updates immediately (after appropriate testing). Implement filters at the email gateway to filter out emails with known malspam indicators, such as known malicious subject lines, and block suspicious IP addresses at the firewall... (more)

Posted on 21 July 2018 12:24 am



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